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Wednesday, December 08, 2021

Jenna Walters


CAMPUS NEWS

Professor acknowledges, apologizes for wearing blackface in past

UW-Madison counseling psychology professor William Hoyt apologized to colleagues and students after disclosing that he donned blackface during a performance at the Overture Center in the early 2000s.  Hoyt sent other department faculty members an email Monday apologizing for causing discomfort when he admitted during a game of “two truths and a lie” at the department awards ceremony to participating in “blackface or really brown face.” 

CAMPUS NEWS

Native land, history preserved on UW-Madison campus

Today, UW-Madison’s campus is known for the Mendota Terrace, Bascom Hill and the Lakeshore path. Preservation efforts focus on these prominent areas, but many don’t realize campus’ footprint is relatively new.  UW-Madison was built on Ho-Chunk land and the tribe’s cultural representation is still physically present on campus, despite contemporary changes to the land.  Evidence of human settlement on the land surrounding Waaksikhomik, meaning "where the man lies" (Lake Mendota) dates back 12,000 years. There are at least 28 habitation sites on the campus shoreline of Lake Mendota.

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CAMPUS NEWS

Access to alcohol among concerns expressed in external Greek Life review session

UW-Madison representatives expressed their concerns and suggestions about the university’s Greek community to a panel of experts at an open session held at Memorial Union Monday.  Representatives from University Housing, University Health Services and UW-Madison Greek Chapters along with other community members gathered at an open session held as part of an external review of UW-Madison’s Greek community, to lend their input on what works successfully in the Greek community on campus and what needs to be changed. 

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One ad in the “Mythbuster” campaign highlights why in-state tuition can benefit Wisconsin residents.

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Dr. Christy Clark-Pujara spoke to approximately 60 students about the historical aspects of race in the U.S. and how this history plays a role in UW-Madison students’ day-to-day life.

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