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The Daily Cardinal Est. 1892
Sunday, July 03, 2022

Aaron Durlauf


Daily Cardinal
ARTS

Finding Comfort in Prose

Like many, I was shocked by the results of the election last week. The country is incredibly divided and there are various groups of people who face the prospect of policies that threaten their homes, bodily autonomy and safety.

Daily Cardinal
News

Climbing PoeTree reading enlightens Union South audience

April 19, slam poetry duo Climbing PoeTree gave a stellar performance in the Northwoods room of Union South. Alixa Garcia and Naima Penniman, who make up the group, integrated spoken word, hip-hop played on traditional instruments and multimedia presentations throughout their show. The pieces centered around environmental, racial, class-based and gender-based oppressions.

News

Climbing PoeTree brings unique performance model to Union South

On Saturday, spoken word duo Climbing PoeTree will be performing at Union South in the Northwoods Room at 7pm. The group consists of Alixa Garcia and Naima Penniman, whose performances interweave spoken word, hip-hop, and multimedia theater. Climbing PoeTree focuses on shedding light on injustice and oppression and using our hopes to create a vision of a better future.

Daily Cardinal
OPINION

US has moral obligation in providing foreign aid

In 2000, the United Nations adopted the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), a set of eight humanitarian missions to be completed by 2015. The goals included eradication of extreme poverty and hunger, universal primary education, gender equality, reduction of child mortality rates, improvement of maternal health, combatting diseases such as HIV/AIDS and malaria, ensuring environmental sustainability and the creation of a global partnership for development. Each of the goals was also set with specific numerical milestones to track the project.

Daily Cardinal
OPINION

Willful ignorance is not a valid excuse

Last summer, I enrolled in a philosophy course here at University of Wisconsin-Madison entitled “Contemporary Moral Issues.” The course, as its name suggests, involved students reading academic papers about rational arguments for the ethical permissibility or unacceptability of a number of policies, such as capital punishment, abortion, voluntary active euthanasia and the consumption of meat produced by factory farms. I came into the class with fairly strong beliefs about most of the subjects, with little expectation of having my mind changed.

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