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Tuesday, August 03, 2021

Science

Daily Cardinal
SCIENCE

Feminist biology provides a new scientific perspective

Caroline VanSickle’s office was exactly what I would expect the office of an anthropologist to look like with a handkerchief-sized cloth printed with hominid skulls laying draped over a bookshelf and a tiny replica of a pelvis resting on top of the cloth. VanSickle herself sat in front of a computer that flicked through pictures of animals in their natural habitats. When I sat down and we started to chat, it was like I had known her for years, even though this was only the second time we had conversed.


Flu shot
SCIENCE

Flu shots give important protection

Just as Madison makes its annual seasonal transition from fall to winter it also enters a season of a different type; the flu season. Every year starting in early October and lasting until the end of May, the contagious seasonal influenza virus spreads across the United States causing widespread illness and sometimes severe, life-threatening complications. While regular hand washing, not sharing food and avoiding touching your hands to your face have been shown to decrease the likelihood of getting infected with the virus, the single most effective way to prevent getting the virus is to get the seasonal flu shot at the start of the flu season each year.


Bacterial genome reveals possible new fuels and chemicals
SCIENCE

Bacterial genomes reveal new fuel

Using bacterial genes, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison were able to identify furan containing fatty acids; compounds that could potentially be replacement components for oil in the fuel industry and chemicals in the pharmaceutical industry.


Daily Cardinal
SCIENCE

Mouse study expands tumor knowledge

When we think of ways to prevent or treat cancer, temperature control usually isn’t high on the list. But, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, led by Dr. Caroline Alexander at the McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, have made crucial progress in understanding a link between ambient temperature and how it may affect our ability to resist tumors.


Daily Cardinal
SCIENCE

Scientists authenticate human smile

A genuine smile can be a wonderful sight. It can energize us if we are feeling blue and encourage us when we are feeling troubled. It can give us strength, happiness, fortitude and peace. But all smiles are not created equal. There are kind smiles and cruel smiles, excited smiles and hopeless smiles. How is it that we are able to tell real smiles from false smiles?


Daily Cardinal
SCIENCE

UW research sparks cancer treatment innovations

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have made an important advancement toward improved imaging and treatment of cancer. Over years of research, they have developed a class of molecules that accumulate in cancer cells—and not in other cells of the body—making it possible to specifically target cancerous growths.


Science flow chart
SCIENCE

Stem cells allow new way to create muscle cells

Stem cells were first discovered at the University of Toronto in the 1960s and have since become one of the most promising fields in biological research. Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that have the ability to differentiate into a variety of specialized cells under the right conditions.


Daily Cardinal
SCIENCE

UW develops new asthma test

Asthma affects one in every 12 people in the United States and this trend is increasing every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Conventionally, patients are diagnosed through indirect measures such as lung functionality.  Direct methods have traditionally required a venipuncture blood draw and thus have been impractical because they can’t be used with everyone. However, with the kit-on-a-lid-assay (KOALA) microfluidic technology developed by a team of the University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers, only one drop of blood is required to detect asthma.


Daily Cardinal
SCIENCE

Exercise program for elderly reduces injury risks

Modern advancements in medicine have allowed the human population to live longer than ever before. There are currently more elderly citizens on our planet than there have ever been. By definition, a person is referred to as elderly or older if they are at least 65 years old. In 2009, the elderly population in the U.S. consisted of 39.6 million people, or about 13 percent of our nation’s population. This number is expected to almost double by 2030 due to a larger younger population that is expected to live longer.


Daily Cardinal
SCIENCE

Wisconsin Institututes for Discovery develop new method of cleaning up oil spills

Imagine, if you will, a slick black surface extending as far as the eye can see, where once-clear water now laps sluggishly and dead fish float. This is the reality imposed upon our environment by oil spills, the disastrous result of many oil-tanker or oil-rig accidents. When a large amount of oil is leaked out into the ocean, it can form a coat on top of the water's surface that poisons and smothers sea creatures—especially those that live on the surface of the water.

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