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The Daily Cardinal Est. 1892
Sunday, June 16, 2024
As state legislators clash over how to ensure student safety from gun violence, state Rep. Jesse Kremer, R-Kewaskum, has introduced a bill to allow guns into private schools.

As state legislators clash over how to ensure student safety from gun violence, state Rep. Jesse Kremer, R-Kewaskum, has introduced a bill to allow guns into private schools.

Legislators butt heads over how to handle gun violence

In the wake of the Parkland tragedy, state Rep. Jesse Kremer, R-Kewaskum, proposed a bill that would allow concealed carry permit holders to bring guns onto private school campuses, garnering criticisms from fellow politicians, school officials and even students.

Under the bill, concealed carry holders would gain a licensing exemption from the federal Gun-Free School Zone Act, making it legal to bring guns on campus, given the school’s permission.

“Wisconsin law does not allow a law abiding concealed carry holder parent, or a competent, lawfully licensed teacher or superintendent, the ability to protect themselves or their children while on school grounds,” Kremer said in a press release.

In reference to previous legislative attempts to allow guns in schools — only to end in committee purgatory — Kremer argued that it’s “high time that Madison politics get out of the way of your child’s safety at school.”

His colleagues across the aisle, however, have different ideas when it comes to solving the crisis.

Assembly Democrats last Wednesday sent letters to prominent Republican leaders, including Gov. Scott Walker, with calls from both Democrats and local high school students to advance “common sense” gun laws.

“How do you expect students to be successful when kids have to worry about themselves, their friends, and their teachers being shot?” said sophomore Lydia Hester.

Democratic lawmakers then went on to advance several proposed gun safety measures, including universal background checks, prohibiting domestic violence offenders from purchasing guns and outlawing bump stocks, which turn semi-automatic weapons fully automatic.

“My family owns guns for hunting, but I am absolutely in favor of gun safety measures because I was raised to believe that if you cannot use a gun ethically and safely, you should not use it at all,” said Anne Motoviloff, a high school junior. “However, this belief does not seem to be shared by our government. The reforms we are advocating for are not aimed at taking away rights, but ensuring that every Wisconsinite is not forced to live with the fear of the occurrence of a shooting in their community.”

The proposals are unlikely to advance beyond their committee assignments in the Republican-controlled Legislature.

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