Record Routine: Jams for the morning after a party in Kellogg's new album

In a style popularized by Chance The Rapper and Mac Miller, Mic Kellogg delivers an atmospheric album that channels the vocal styles of many up-and-coming rap artists while giving Milwaukee producer Charles Mammyth Forsberg a proper introduction to a larger audience. While Mic Kellogg’s name is on the cover, Mammyth deserves a heavy amount of credit for mixing this magnum opus of an ear pleaser.

Kellogg is an artist reigning from Madison that now calls Milwaukee his home. Dare I say this is very audible in Kellogg’s musical choices that were made on this freshman LP, as the Midwest weather, scenery and musical surroundings are evident.

The sing-song style with which Chance The Rapper delivers his bars is employed by Kellogg on “Breakfast (Intro),” while the soulful backup singers sound like they were ripped directly from Acid Rap. “Breakfast (Intro)” gives the listener an accurate introduction to the album, an album that sounds like it should be played during the earlier parts of the day while indulging in the fattier of breakfast foods and recovering from the night before.

There are no harsh beats and no sharp edges on Breakfast, the success of which depends on who is listening. “Head Up” embraces a positive outlook on life and fighting through hard times in order to keep chasing success. Another background singer appears, imploring Kellogg and the listener to “keep your head up,” a mantra that is likely very applicable to a young artist attempting to gain popularity in the tumultuous Midwest hip-hop community.

“Take Me” holds an example of one of five different wonderfully crafted cover photos used on this album, all taken from Mic Kellogg’s point of view looking down at the table in front of him. The atmosphere that surrounds the ear is a perfect example of breakfast music: minimalist beat, flowing ambience and slurring lyrics from Kellogg.

Breakfast would do a better job highlighting the morning after a wild concert than the experience of a wild concert itself. While some may prefer the former, the latter is what is pleasurable on a Sunday afternoon, the beginning of a hot day or to welcome the weekend after class on Friday.

Although Breakfast may sound very similar to many projects coming out of Kellogg’s region, the mixing by Mammyth combines lovely jazz, atmospheric hip-hop and Kellogg’s voice to create a satisfying finished work. I do not know whether to be skeptical of how much this album sounds like other recent Midwest rap projects or to accept Breakfast as advancing the craft with another well-produced album that reflects the joys and plights of millennials.

Grade: B-

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