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Monday, April 12, 2021

Suma Samudrala


SCIENCE

Increased Frizzled-6 expression is associated with increased bone tumor formation

Cancer in the simplest terms can be described as the abnormal and uncontrollable growth of cells. While the symptoms, diagnosis and prognosis are different and unique for every individual affected by this disease, research from the past few years has determined that most cancers are characterized by a series of genetic malfunctions that eventually lead to disruption in the molecular activity in cells. While cancer has been most commonly associated with humans, it can affect most multicellular organisms, including dogs. Research collaboration by Timothy Stein, an assistant professor of oncology, and Michael Newton, a professor of statistics and biostatics and medical informatics, has revealed a potential protein over-expressed in tumor cells called frizzled-6.

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SCIENCE

Nanotubes help better electronics

Starting from scraps, material scientists search for raw materials that can be innovated or substituted to increase the functional efficiency and flexibility of the appropriate technologies. The idea behind the field stems from the notion that the efficiency of a product can be compromised by the choice of material used to construct such devices even with the best abilities of an engineer. Two members in this field from UW-Madison include Associate Professor Michael Arnold and Professor of Material Science and Engineering Padma Gopalan.

SCIENCE

Oxygen is the green oxidant

University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of chemistry, Shannon Stahl, received one of the five Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  for his work with aerobic oxidations.  Green chemistry concerns the reduction or elimination of hazardous wastes through specifically researched products or processes. It represents an effort toward providing environmental benefit via cleaner air and water through toxic waste elimination. The award was created by the EPA to recognize novel green chemistry.

SCIENCE

Bacterial genomes reveal new fuel

Using bacterial genes, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison were able to identify furan containing fatty acids; compounds that could potentially be replacement components for oil in the fuel industry and chemicals in the pharmaceutical industry.

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SCIENCE

Self-powered electronics may be the future

Xudong Wang, an assistant professor of material science and engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is a researcher in the field of nanogenerators, a technology that harvests mechanical or thermal energy into electricity. Wang was one of the early pioneers in the use of nanomaterials to harvest mechanical energy. While research on mechanical energy harvesting already existed, Wang helped advance nanomaterials for this application. While doing his post-doctorate at Georgia Institute of Technology, he developed the first nanogenerator.

SCIENCE

Holoflops could prevent parasites

A prevalent health problem in the developing countries of the tropics and subtropics is helminth or parasitic worm transmission. Among the most common parasites is a hookworm or a nematode roundworm with hooked mouthparts known to cause tissue obstruction, anemia and infestation in the stomach.

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SCIENCE

UW works to understand cosmos

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is home to the Plasma dynamo experiment led by physics professor Cary Forest and his colleagues. This experiment has been designed to study plasma physics, which is the study of plasma state of matter. Plasma is a matter different from solids, liquids and normal gases in that it is a highly ionized gas composed of ions, electrons and neutral particles.

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