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Thursday, May 23, 2024

UW-Madison

CAMPUS NEWS

Wisconsin Black Student Union challenges student athletes’ role in campus activism

With NFL player Colin Kaepernick’s national anthem protest continuing to appear in headlines, UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Black Student Union hosted an open discussion on the role of student athletes in campus social justice movements. “Talk to Me Tuesdays” is a new initiative lead by the WBSU to stimulate an open discussion of racial issues and experiences related to race.


UW-Madison undergraduates research shows that institutions limit the number of qualified black students that can attend their schools by requiring high test scores from underfunded schools.
CAMPUS NEWS

Undergraduates’ research exposes institutional racism of standardized testing

Three UW-Madison undergraduates have attempted to uncover through research that standardized testing exemplifies systematic racism and makes it challenging for young black students to attend college. UW-Madison juniors Tyriek Mack and Marquise Mays, along with sophomore Tashiana Lipscomb, presented their research on this topic through their project titled “Standardized Testing: The Social Warfare Against Black Men.” They traveled to Bermuda and shared their findings with other researchers, including numerous Ph.D.


CAMPUS NEWS

PAVE holds workshop to build healthy relationships

Students decided what makes a romantic relationship healthy by interacting with one another at a workshop Thursday. Promoting Awareness Victim Empowerment peer facilitators lead the interactive workshop called “Build A Healthy Relationship” about what healthy romantic relationships look like.


CAMPUS NEWS

Social justice organizer inspires students with activism experience

Community organizer and activist Bree Newsome discussed “Tearing Hate From the Sky” Wednesday evening as part of the Multicultural Student Center’s social justice speaker series. Newsome is an intersectional social justice activist who is most well-known for scaling the flagpole at the South Carolina State House and removing the Confederate flag in 2015.


CAMPUS NEWS

Panel urges student of color to engage through activism, voting

In an election cycle marked by racial tensions and controversial voter ID laws, a community panel at the Black and Brown Vote Discussion Wednesday night emphasized to students the importance of voting in November as well as engaging in non-traditional methods of civic action. The panel—composed of journalism professor Mike Wagner, history professor Cindy I-Fen Cheng, Associated Students of Madison Vice Chair Mariam Coker, student activist Jessica Franco-Morales, co-founder of Young Gifted and Black Coalition Matthew Braunginn and alumna of the PEOPLE program Jessenia Gomez—urged those in attendance to vote and organize through non-traditional methods to enact change on campus and in the community.


CAMPUS NEWS

Reports of hate and bias more than triple on campus

The number of hate and bias incidents reported on campus has increased from 18 in Fall 2015 to 66, according to the Bias Response Team’s Spring 2016 Bias Incident Report. Dean of Students Lori Berquam and Chair of the Bias Response Team Joshua Moon Johnson discussed the details found in the report in a conference call on the day of its release Wednesday.


CAMPUS NEWS

Panelists toy around with idea of playing in adulthood

Audience members jumped across hopscotch squares to their theater seats, which held containers in the cupholders filled with small animal figurines and bouncy balls to entertain themselves during an interactive panel discussion, “Playing with Play.” Four panelists discussed the importance of playing, and how it is not just for children, at the Fredric March Play Circle Theater in Memorial Union Tuesday.


The LGBT Campus Center encouraged attendees to express their sexuality among friends at their National Coming Out Day social event.
CAMPUS NEWS

LGBT Campus Center celebrates National Coming Out Day

The LGBT Campus Center staff and UW-Madison students gathered at the Red Gym to celebrate the 28th anniversary of National Coming Out Day Tuesday. The National Coming Out Day Open House was a social event where attendees could enjoy refreshments and "come out" of a purple door. The open house was a chance for UW-Madison students in the LGBT community to celebrate coming out about their sexuality.


Wisconsin head coach Greg Gard and the rest of UW's men's basketball team teamed up with students to raise more than $20,000 for cancer research Monday afternoon.
CAMPUS NEWS

Men’s basketball team, students aim to shoot down cancer

Hundreds of students stepped onto the Kohl Center floor for the fifth annual “Shooting Down Cancer” Monday in an event that brought together the Wisconsin basketball program and its student body. While the event was fun for everyone involved, for head coach Greg Gard and his team it’s a way to impact current cancer patients and future cancer research. This is Gard’s first year leading the event; he took the reins from former Wisconsin head coach Bo Ryan, who retired last December.


CAMPUS NEWS

ASM passes legislation to recognize Columbus Day as Indigenous Peoples Day

The Associated Students of Madison Student Council passed legislation Wednesday to recognize the second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples Day throughout campus. Although UW-Madison does not formally recognize Columbus Day as a holiday, the resolution called on the Faculty Senate and Chancellor Rebecca Blank to officially name the date Indigenous Peoples Day to acknowledge the Native American community on campus and throughout Dane County.


Jamein Cunningham of Portland State University discussed legal and racial relations in the 1960s and ’70s at Thursday’s Institute for Research on Poverty seminar.
CAMPUS NEWS

Professor discusses legal services, race riots of 1960s

Though simply tweeting #BlackLivesMatter after a police shooting might be easy, professor Jamein Cunningham explained that immersing yourself in research and data on legal and racial relations of the 1960s and ’70s is a substantially more effective response. Cunningham, an economics professor at Portland State University, presented findings from his extensive study on this topic at a seminar Thursday at Memorial Union, hosted by the Institute for Research on Poverty.


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