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The Daily Cardinal Est. 1892
Saturday, October 01, 2022

Columnists

Jack Baer
COLUMNS

Big MLB contracts are not automatically disastrous

Obvious statement: the Angels regret giving Josh Hamilton $125 million. They paid a king’s ransom for three mediocre, injury-plagued seasons and a whole lot of (semi-deserved) bad press. Pro tip to Arte Moreno: Don’t “Mean Girls” a recovering drug addict while trying to use a contract clause that doesn’t exist to recoup money you freely gave to him knowing the risk associated. You’d think they’d teach that in billionaire class.


Jake
COLUMNS

With TV in Limbo, it’s time to present some mid-year awards

The school year is almost over, and spring TV is just heating up. In the limited amount of time we have left together, I figured I would write a totally arbitrary awards column, partly because there’s not really any new TV happening this week. What follows is a number of awards I’ve given to shows throughout the year: Awards named after my favorite examples from other shows. Look, the point of this exercise is not to reinvent the wheel—or the awards column—just to bestow awards to those I deem deserving. 


Mosh Pit
COLUMNS

Release your animal instincts with music

It’s not discussed too often, but musical composition is wedded to mathematics. The way certain frequencies and tones sound good together is an artistic extension of physical laws that govern our universe. We currently live in an era of human technology where a computer program can make a piano composition so genuine that humans can’t distinguish its creation from a fellow human’s. Slowly, every part of our society that we used to accredit to mysticism and luck can now be explained by modern mathematical algorithms. Perhaps not in our lifetimes, but soon enough maybe even the human brain will be seen as nothing more than a series of biological wires and programming. 


Grey Satterfield
COLUMNS

Parallels between the NBA Playoffs, college life run deep

The first round of the NBA playoffs has a little bit of everything: the wonderful play of the Warriors, the crap pile that was Toronto, the wonderful Spurs-Clippers series, the Rondo disaster and everything in between. The ups and downs as well as constant swings in momentum are what makes it so appealing and what makes it so similar to life.


Austin
COLUMNS

Stop studying and put in a good movie before finals

So as finals dawn on us once again, many of you will be looking for ways to less productively divert your time and eradicate stress (while preserving brain cells). And while, as a film student, watching films “technically” counts as studying for me, it remains the absolute perfect way to kill a couple of hours. So without further ado, I humbly present a list of films, from old favorites to new friends, with which to amuse, thrill, reflect on and altogether distract yourself this, or any, exam’s eve (and for bonus points, most of them are on Netflix).


Daily Cardinal
CAMPUS NEWS

Video games is a medium worth studying as an art

I find myself often stymied when considering how to write about games. Not truly permeated into the mainstream (though advocates will herald the “Call of Duty” series’ gross as “larger than Hollywood”) I find myself often simply justifying the thought I put into the medium. Yet the games themselves and the subtexts they contain is enough to merit study as a form of literature, akin to the study of cinema and television.


Daily Cardinal
COLUMNS

Bruce Jenner’s interview shows necesity for greater visibility of transgender individuals in the media

I remember the first time I was asked to state my personal gender pronouns. Sitting in a forum at “Engaged and Empowered: the Lieutenant Governor’s Conference on LGBT Youth” at UW-Oshkosh in March 2010, I had to ask for clarification what “PGPs” are. At that time, I was an ignorant, 16-year-old queer teenager who had never been asked to state his gender. 


Rushad Machhi
COLUMNS

Kaminsky, Dekker both face uncertainty at the next level

The 2014-’15 Wisconsin men’s basketball team produced a lot of things, including great memories, cut-down nets and two potential first-round NBA draft picks. After drying away the tears, we heard that Sam Dekker is truly gone, and he will join his co-star and Wooden Award winner Frank Kaminsky at the next level. 


Jake
COLUMNS

Fire and dragons permeate ‘Game of Thrones’ fifth season opener

We’re back, baby. Last Sunday night, the great television experiment known to us mere mortals as “Game of Thrones” continued its meteoric ascent into our hearts and minds. Viewers have all been waiting for it, and when the first four episodes leaked online yesterday, thousands of our weaker brethren downloaded it. It’s easily the biggest thing to happen on television this year. As such, it is only fitting that I use the space provided to sing its praises (as well as make some make some minor complaints). Warning—spoilers from Sunday’s episode, and some mild book-reader nit-picking follows. 


Abbie
COLUMNS

Rap Genius threatens the art of music

This week I have a question for you guys: Have you ever noticed the number of people with headphones in on your way to class? I am one of those people, and I always find myself wondering what other people are listening to and why they are listening to it. After much consideration and wondering I think I’ve come to a conclusion: People listen to the songs they do based on how it makes them feel and what it means to them.


Daily Cardinal
COLUMNS

Finding originality in franchised repeats

The sensation that everything has been done is common and overwhelming in art. Games currently are experiencing a massive and overwhelming version of this issue; with a lack of successful non-sequel games on our brick-and-mortar marketplaces, we find ourselves lauding iterative improvements, such as the blue-shell-stopping horn in “Mario Kart 8” or the Sky-Hook in “BioShock Infinite.” This is neither an abnormal nor a bad thing; artistic evolution comes slowly and less focus on innovation allows for expression and execution to come to the fore. It’s also a generalization ignoring those games with drastically new gameplay styles like the independent games “Sportsfriends” or “Mini Metro.”


Jake Witz
COLUMNS

How music festivals evolved over time

In the beginning there were artists. Single-celled organisms that produced art on a small scale. Some artists would group together to form bands that were able to make more complex music at the same rate. A bunch of artists got the bright idea to see what happened when they all clumped together and performed art all in one place. This petri dish became known as the music festival. 8,500 individuals attended at the Monterey Pop Festival way back in 1967. 


Jim Dayton
COLUMNS

Season not diminished by championship game loss

I didn’t think I would come to accept the Badgers’ title game loss to Duke as quickly as I did. It’s only been a week now, but Wisconsin’s defeat to one of the most hated teams in college basketball seems like a distant memory.


Daily Cardinal
COLUMNS

Finding happiness in the little frustrations of golf

I’ve always thought of The Masters as the unofficial start to golf season. The “tradition unlike any other” is full of slightly overweight, middle-aged white guys competing in the sport’s most prestigious tournament, with an ugly green jacket awarded to the victor. Doesn’t that get you pumped?


Daily Cardinal
COLUMNS

Hip-hop cover songs need something special to stand out

Last week, Mos Def released a series of videos via FACT Magazine of him covering various MF Doom songs. With each successive video, a hooded figure revealed more and more of his face until the final video, when he finally unmasks himself as the Grammy-nominated emcee. The mask imagery is a clear homage to MF Doom’s iconic mask that few have seen him without. More of a tribute than a proper cover, Mos Def rapped several of MF Doom’s songs, using the same lyrics and the original beats.


Maham
COLUMNS

Sports lit explores the lessons behind competition

I’m not a sports fan. I never have been and I probably never will be. Not for lack of trying though because I tried for half of my life to either excel at some sport or really fall in love with one. I couldn’t do either and never do I feel that loss more as when I witness the love and devotion for a sport by thousands, if not millions of people during sporting events. 


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