Skip to Content, Navigation, or Footer.
The Daily Cardinal Est. 1892
Monday, January 30, 2023

Columnists

Callie
COLUMNS

Television delights waiting to wow you this summer

Our final days of classes are soon to be a distant and fuzzy memory, clouded by the sting of UV rays and the familiar scent of sunblock. Summer is fast-approaching, which means some much needed time to relax, decompress and question your life choices after yet another grueling semester. But who needs Vitamin D and sandy beaches when you have a recliner and a guide channel that’s saturated with some fantastic new shows? Here are a few of the upcoming series I am most excited for. You can bet your firstborns I’ll be holed up safely indoors for these summer premieres.


Daily Cardinal
COLUMNS

Beautiful books to get you through the summer

With the end of semester, quite literally looming ahead of you like a giant honing beacon you can’t hide from, it is perhaps time to look back and reflect. You might have added many accolades to your name this spring, what with having survived the mother of all cold winters and making it halfway through 2014, but I bet you couldn’t name a life-changing book you read.


Adam Paris columnist mug
COLUMNS

Video game lingo helps move industry forward

Game criticism has evolved so completely from its early years to the point that many modern reviews would look wholly foreign to the ’80s, neon-jacket wearing kids who read Nintendo Power. Assuredly many outlets do still follow the basic framework established back then. A succinct summation of the game’s features, how well the story holds up, its replayability, etc.—these terms aren’t likely to go away, but they do demonstrate an advancement of the gaming lexicon.


Callie Kollenbroich columnist mug
COLUMNS

FX’s ‘Fargo’ just as worthy as original

Nestled among the frozen plains of the snowy American landscape is a locale as foreign to some as it is familiar to my corn-growing, cheese-loving roots. The inhabitants of this region bundle themselves in fur hats and down parkas and express themselves with an abundance of “Oh ya”s and “You betcha”s. Their daily struggles range from whether or not to make meatloaf for dinner to how to best cover up a botched attempt at kidnapping your own wife for ransom. This is the Midwest, or at least the Midwest envisioned by a pair of goofball filmmakers known informally to us as the Coen brothers. Yah der hey.


Callie
COLUMNS

Confession of a belated convert: catching up with 'Game of Thrones'

It’s been over four years since the inception of one of premium cable’s most celebrated series—HBO’s "Game of Thrones,”—and I must admit that until a few weeks ago I couldn’t have cared less. It’s not that I thought I wouldn’t enjoy it—I take pleasure in nerding out to medieval fantasy dramas as much as the rest of you—but at the time I had my nose in other pastures. Long story short, I had already been watching far too much TV and I just wasn’t ready for the commitment.


Austin Wellens
COLUMNS

‘Cheap Thrills’ does not skimp on delights

So, over the weekend I got to spend some time with E.L. Katz and Pat Healy, who respectively directed and starred in the new film “Cheap Thrills,” and I learned a thing or two. I learned about Danish people. I learned about what really matters when you’re making a movie. I found out that some men can just rock a mustache. And I learned that sometimes light and dark can blend together beautifully.


Adam Paris columnist mug
COLUMNS

Keeping mundanity in modern games

Mundanity is alluring. Typically a sentence like that would seem like a fairly overt contradiction, but when it comes to video games it tends to hold true. Games are built on bombast, splendor and extravagance. Most commercial games appeal to the player looking for the greatest spectacle possible. Graphical power struggles have existed in the industry for decades, but the minute, sparkly details in modern consoles are exacerbated in the battle for people’s loyalty.


Brian Weidy
COLUMNS

Turnover constitutes reality of bands

Last week, when Nirvana was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame—which is a sham and will probably be addressed in another column—they needed someone to replace the deceased Kurt Cobain. So in came a quartet of female singers: St. Vincent, Lorde, Joan Jett and Kim Gordon.


Callie Kollenbroich columnist mug
COLUMNS

‘Bates Motel’ an uneasy take on Hitchcock

Let’s talk about Alfred Hitchcock—master of suspense and arguably categorized among some of the greatest American filmmakers of all time. One of his most acclaimed thrillers, as well as one of my personal favorites, was the 1960 American classic, “Psycho.” Some critics called it the most terrifying film ever made. It was not only groundbreaking stylistically but ideologically as well. Having wanted it to retain the look and feel of a cheap exploitation flick, “Psycho” featured sexually explicit content and brutal violence that was largely frowned upon by studio censors—it had a shower scene before the shower scene was a thing. Whether or not you agree, cinephiles of the last fifty years continue to applaud him as a pioneer in the industry for his precise pacing and ability to subvert our expectations through meticulous plot construction, impressive camerawork and clever editing, among other things.



Powered by SNworks Solutions by The State News
All Content © 2023 The Daily Cardinal