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Wednesday, September 22, 2021

Column

COLUMNS

New column celebrates black girl magic

From Beyoncé and her newest song “Formation” to pioneers like Shirley Chisholm, black women have paved the way for style, politics, culture, education and more since the beginning of time.


Daily Cardinal
COLUMNS

Florida and Michigan revival not a shocker

For two historically great programs, it is surprisingly surprising that Michigan and Florida are having the kind of success that they are this season. After spending the last few seasons in a dungeon of mediocrity, coaching changes at each school have thus far brought back the kind of winning and dominance generally associated with each program. However, most experts or random college columnist such as myself, did not see this kind of progress coming so quickly, as both teams were left out of both preseason polls, and many predicted it would take at least a couple years to return back to relevance. Yet, maybe we really should have seen the turnaround Jim Harbaugh’s Wolverines and Jim McElwain’s Gators are in the midst of this year, as there were plenty of potential signs that pointed in that direction for each program.


jake
COLUMNS

Time crumbles things, even your all-time favorite record

I’ve heard friends and music critics alike describe many an album as “timeless.” I more often than not agree with their selections; The Velvet Underground & Nico, Loveless and Endtroducing….. are just a few of the albums that still sound fresh when played today. But in the back of my mind, I fear that these albums just operate on a longer timeline, their relevancy decaying at an unnoticeable rate, but all the while still decaying.


Daily Cardinal
COLUMNS

‘Leviathan’ has reputation as novelistic movie

It seems super easy to compare the latest Russian cinematic masterpiece, Andrey Zvyagintsev’s “Leviathan,” to the great literary works of Fyodor Dostoevsky or Leo Tolstoy; just look at the number of reviews that described the film as being “novelistic.” And to be fair, the comparison (especially to Dostoevsky) isn’t entirely ungrounded. The film shares its breathtaking scope (and runtime), band of fully realized and psychologically complex characters, questions of suicide/existence and overt, proud references to the Bible with the likes of “The Brothers Karamazov” and “The Idiot.” Plus the film’s wordless, eye-opening passages rank with the most awe-inspiring moments of prose in any language. 



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