Skip to Content, Navigation, or Footer.
The Daily Cardinal Est. 1892
Friday, May 27, 2022

Arts

arts_rainbowkittensurprise.jpg
ARTS

Rainbow Kitten Surprise serves up mellow Monday soul food at the Sylvee

As I rushed to the Rainbow Kitten Surprise concert at the Sylvee this past Monday night, I had high expectations after their gig at Majestic Theatre last year, which was full of head-bang worthy rock-inspired renditions of their classics and an intimate feel despite Sam Melo’s overwhelmingly energetic stage presence. However, this show was quite different from the last time I saw RKS — mellow undertones dominated, and I felt as though I was digging into a giant, steaming bowl of soul food during their set. 


arts-Thank_U,_Next cover.jpg
ARTS

‘thank u, next’ is spectacularly honest, celebration of self-love

Ariana Grande ended 2018 as the most relevant pop star and for good reason. Grande released her fifth studio album, thank u, next, just over five months after the well-received Sweetener. She experienced astounding commercial success, all while crafting her unique brand and reviving pop through heavy EDM, R&B, and hip-hop influence. Following an aggressive year of personal relationships in the spotlight, Grande hinted she’d been healing in the studio. She released three singles — one, of course, the infamous title track “thank u, next” and its iconic accompanying video — in anticipation of the album. 


Can You Ever Forgive Me?
ARTS

McCarthy shows off acting range in 'Can You Ever Forgive Me?'

Although Melissa McCarthy is best known for her unfiltered, aggressive and outright hilarious performances (“Bridesmaids”, “The Heat”), it’s clearly evident that this comedic genius is quite capable of tackling dramatic, darkly comedic roles as well. Such is the case in “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” from director Marielle Heller, a rather different kind of film that can best be described as pleasantly enjoyable. 


art-velvet buzzsaw from NME.jpg
ARTS

Netflix film 'Velvet Buzzsaw' fine but falls flat

As I comb through the marketing (or lack thereof) in the wake of viewing “Velvet Buzzsaw,” I’m repeatedly confounded by director Dan Gilroy’s quasi-epithetic obsession as the creator of the fantastic 2014 neo-noir “Nightcrawler". While “Nightcrawler” knows exactly what it is in both grounded characterization and sensical narrative progression, “Velvet Buzzsaw” is a gross juxtaposition to such competency. 


Listen now


Print

Read our print edition on Issuu Read on Issuu


Powered by SNworks Solutions by The State News
All Content © 2022 The Daily Cardinal