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Sunday, March 03, 2024
Though some of the crowd was with friends or significant others, each person still seemed to connect to the art that was right in front of them.

Though some of the crowd was with friends or significant others, each person still seemed to connect to the art that was right in front of them.

?Baths connects audience to his melodic, tranquil music

On Tuesday, April 10, the Majestic Theatre on State Street turned the lights off and cranked the music up. Sasami started the evening off, followed by the band No Joy, with Baths ending the upbeat night on a great note.

When Sasami took the stage, shades of red and blue lights illuminated the room, which excited the audience. The crowd was initially spread out over the large room, socializing in preparation for Baths, but Sasami immediately invited everyone to “come closer” and share her musical passion. She continued by saying “I don’t bite… or maybe I do.” Her welcoming personality was certainly a positive choice for an opening act — she definitely locked the audience in for what was soon to come.

While being a multi-instrumentalist on the guitar and keyboard, Sasami carried a powerful voice, as she sang with emotion and edge about past relationships. She connected to the audience as she asked them to “take a moment of silence for the last person you’ve fucked,” in a completely serious tone. This typically would have prompted awkwardness and an uncomfortable wave of silence. However, her unique personality mixed with the thrilling music that she actually brought the audience alive.

After Sasami performed about five heart-wrenching, yet rhythmic songs, it was the Canadian rock band No Joy’s turn to rock out and take the stage, consisting of two female guitarists and one male drummer. The loud music shook the theatre as the audience seemed to be avid fans and familiar with their music. The lights covered the musicians' faces, and the blaring noise overpowered any excess thoughts in mind, which made the audience focus solely on the beat of the music.

As No Joy truly left their mark on the stage with their thunderous music, Baths entered the room with a calmer tone. Baths, or Will Wiesenfeld — his off-stage name — is from Los Angeles. He took his stage name from his days of musical practice in the bathtub as a child, and his unique performance name connected with his melodic music. His music took me to a fantasy land where I was able to let go of any surrounding thoughts and share his soothing lyrics to his song “Lovely Bloodflow.” I was not the only one with this reaction; around me, it was clear that rest of the audience was just as pacific and content as I was.

As the musically brilliant night came to a close, I reflected upon each musician who confidently owned the stage. I realized that each member of the audience was there to simply enjoy the music and tune into each song. Though some of the crowd was with friends or significant others, each person still seemed to connect to the art that was right in front of them. One of the amazing things about attending a concert is coming together with both the musician and the people around you, whether you know them or not. Overall, Sasami, No Joy and Baths each made me feel a connection with myself and the strangers around me, which is undeniably a form of art.

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