Arts

?‘UnReal’ season three nails girl power theme, yet seems disingenuous at times

The white feminism of the "UnReal" protagonists is one of many aspects that make them two of TV’s greatest anti-heroes.

Image By: Photo courtesy of Hulu

In my opinion, “UnReal” is one of TV’s hidden gems. It was perhaps the first show that brought serious attention to Lifetime, as the network was formerly known to air cheesy, made-for-TV movies or “Dance Moms.” “UnReal” follows two female producers, Quinn and Rachel, of a “The Bachelor” parody program called “Everlasting.” They manipulate the contestants of the show, as well as their co-workers, for the sake of good ratings. We’ve found these two ladies back at it for the season three premiere, letting us know their reign is still strong.

Season two ended with one of the more insane finales out there. Rachel’s ex-boyfriend crashes his car into the one belonging to two people threatening to spill all of their secrets, killing them both. Quinn and Rachel know they’re in the clear and aren’t taking it for granted in this new season. Everyone involved in the murder takes a blood oath and are sworn to secrecy. However, since deception and manipulation is the backbone of the show, I can’t imagine this will last long.

Another new twist this season the producers’ addition of a female suitor on their dating show, in an effort to bring ratings back up. Rachel — a self-proclaimed feminist, despite what her actions actually display — sees this as an opportunity to give women a new representation. Quinn and the other producers, on the other hand, are more focused on getting the best ratings — and the best drama — possible. The show is taking the current Trump administration/women’s march era and running with it. It shows the fallbacks of white feminism, which is often disguised as “being progressive.” While the show seems to be striking the whole “girl power” nail on the head, it seems disingenuous at times, like they are hitting too hard.

The white feminism of Quinn and Rachel is one of many aspects of their characters that make them two of TV’s greatest anti-heroes. We don’t often get to see women in the lead, playing objectively terrible people in a complex manner. They’re the Walter Whites of reality TV, honestly, and no matter how much I cringe at how problematic and purely evil they are at times, I can’t help but find myself rooting for them in the end. This is the reason this show has stayed on my list of favorites and I’m thrilled to see that they haven’t lost this element going into their third season.

If the premiere is any indicator of the rest of the season, we are in for quite the treat. The dynamic between Rachel and Quinn and the female suitress is going to be a wild ride —something we’ve haven’t seen yet. Adding in the house full of beautiful and eligible bachelors, we have a recipe for some great over-the-top drama, one that I look forward to ending my week with.

Catch “UnReal” at 10/9 p.m. central, Sundays on Lifetime.

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