Campus News

UW-Madison’s class of 2021 the largest in school history

UW-Madison's class of 2021 consists of 6,610 students, the largest class in school history.

Image By: Alicia Shoberg

UW-Madison’s class of 2021 is one of the largest in school history, according to a university census taken on the 10th day of classes.

This year’s incoming class consists of 6,610 students, a 2.8 percent increase from last year, with total enrollment for the 2017 fall semester increasing by 478 students. Of the 6,610 new students on campus, about 57 percent are Wisconsin residents and about 9 percent are Minnesota residents.

Other Big Ten schools have also experienced enrollment fluctuations. Just like UW-Madison, the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities also welcomed its largest class in school history of over 6,000 students, according to the Minnesota Daily. The University of Iowa, however, experienced a 614-person decrease in the number of first-year students from last year.

Additionally, UW-Madison’s first-generation college student enrollment increased from 16.7 percent of the freshman class last year to 17.2 percent this year, while the University of Iowa, who has 5,029 students in its freshman class, has a greater first-generation enrollment of 23 percent.

UW-Madison officials have attributed the increase in enrollment to the university’s “world-class” educational opportunities, as well as its recent change to accept the Common Application, according to UW-Madison spokesperson Meredith McGlone.

“This very strong class, and the record number of applications that produced it, are indicators of the strength of our teaching and research reputation at home and abroad,” Steve Hahn, vice provost for enrollment management, said in a university release. “We continue to be an attractive destination for students nationally and internationally while maintaining our rock-solid commitment to Wisconsin residents as the UW’s flagship institution.”

The acceptance rate for the class of 2021 was 53.8 percent.

UPDATE 9/25/17 at 11:03 am: This article was updated for additional clarity as a comment from a university spokesperson conflicted with data provided by the Office of the Registrar. 

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