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Saturday, March 06, 2021

Science

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SCIENCE

Increased Frizzled-6 expression is associated with increased bone tumor formation

Cancer in the simplest terms can be described as the abnormal and uncontrollable growth of cells. While the symptoms, diagnosis and prognosis are different and unique for every individual affected by this disease, research from the past few years has determined that most cancers are characterized by a series of genetic malfunctions that eventually lead to disruption in the molecular activity in cells. While cancer has been most commonly associated with humans, it can affect most multicellular organisms, including dogs. Research collaboration by Timothy Stein, an assistant professor of oncology, and Michael Newton, a professor of statistics and biostatics and medical informatics, has revealed a potential protein over-expressed in tumor cells called frizzled-6.


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SCIENCE

Greek yogurt byproduct proves useful

A trip through the dairy aisle reveals America’s latest culinary love story. In an aisle once dominated by palates oforYoplait and Dannon, Greek yogurt has become the norm. Names like Chobani have become yogurt celebrities, while old favorites have had to develop their own Greek yogurts to keep up in a revolution that occurred almost overnight.


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SCIENCE

Murfie reactivates a love of music

Meet Murfie  — the business that stores your CDs and vinyl records in a warehouse and digitizes their content so that you can stream your music collection wherever you are. Founded in 2011 by Preston Austin and Matt Younkle, the company warehouse now holds over 700,000 CDs.


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SCIENCE

Kindness curriculum utilizes the increased brain plasticity of kids

For almost any conceivable skill or field of study, it’s generally accepted that the earlier one starts learning it, the better. Whether the skill be playing hockey, speaking French or composing symphonies, it always seems that the ones who have been doing it since childhood have a higher level of ability and a more natural way of doing whatever it may be. This trend is the result of higher brain plasticity in children, which allows for better assimilation of learning the earlier on it starts.


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SCIENCE

Insects now helping cause climate change

Humans, key contributors to climate change, unknowingly depend on forests to combat the increasing carbon dioxide levels they are introducing into the atmosphere as levels are increasing more rapidly in the last 40 years than ever before.


Neuroaesthetics brain
SCIENCE

Neuroaesthetics ties art with science

Shiela Reaves’ office is exactly what you’d imagine a professor’s office to look like: cozily collegiate with books everywhere. There is an entire wall made up of bookshelves and there are stacks of books on the two desks in the office. When I mentioned to Reaves that I was interested in neuroaesthetics, the science of the visual brain, she began to whirl about her office, plucking books from piles and from the shelves.


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SCIENCE

UW professors honored with NAE nominations

Conducting great research and making exceptional advancements in the field of engineering has earned two UW-Madison professors recognition by membership into an elite institution known as the National Academy of Engineering. Raymond J. Fonck and Thomas M. Jahns were announced as two of the 67 newly nominated members to the 2015 Class of the NAE, a profound professional distinction and high honor in the field.


Baum cell
SCIENCE

Eukaryotic cell has origins questioned

This article is dedicated to Charles Darwin and David Baum. To Charles Darwin because his birthday is this week, February 12th, and to David Baum who exemplifies the humility and cleverness that Darwin himself possessed.


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SCIENCE

UW researcher studies the rare Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

The enormity of research available at UW-Madison comes as no surprise to the students on campus. The research subjects range from common ones such as cancer research to something as rare as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. Truth be told, my understanding of PMD was minimal prior to this article since this disease affects one in almost 200,000 males in the United States. (PMD is an X-linked recessive trait that is only present in males; females are only possible carriers of PMD)


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SCIENCE

Nanotubes help better electronics

Starting from scraps, material scientists search for raw materials that can be innovated or substituted to increase the functional efficiency and flexibility of the appropriate technologies. The idea behind the field stems from the notion that the efficiency of a product can be compromised by the choice of material used to construct such devices even with the best abilities of an engineer. Two members in this field from UW-Madison include Associate Professor Michael Arnold and Professor of Material Science and Engineering Padma Gopalan.


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SCIENCE

Unexpected finding leads to a possible cancer treatment

When graduate student Xiaojun Tan first noticed the epidermal growth factor receptors within the cancer cell, he was surprised. These receptors always branched off the cell’s surface, and had never been observed within the cell quite like this before. Yet, here in these chemically starved cancer cells, an inactive collection of these receptors had accumulated.


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SCIENCE

Scientists track imagination in the brain

With our current level of understanding of the processes of the human brain, attempting to diagnose, treat and identify issues of the mind can be as difficult as launching an expedition into outer space. Just as we have developed many tools over the years to expand our knowledge of the universe, our methods of examination of the interior realm of the brain have similarly been improved upon.


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