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Life in ASM: Balancing student experience while representing peers

As a chair of ASM, Adrian Lampron balances their student experience alongside fellow Badgers while embracing their role connecting students and administration.

As a chair of ASM, Adrian Lampron balances their student experience alongside fellow Badgers while embracing their role connecting students and administration.

Image By: Will Cioci

With a student body of approximately 40,000 students, regulating the University of Wisconsin - Madison is like governing a city. 

Representatives on ASM, the university’s student government, work to bridge student voices with the administration. But outside of these roles, they’re students just like everyone else. 

Adrian Lampron, a second-year student studying political science, history and LGBTQ+ studies, has devoted the majority of their college experience to ASM and is now chair of the equity and inclusion committee. 

“I love the job that I’m doing at ASM,” Lampron said.

Lampron started as an ASM intern their first semester on campus, but as a chair, they now have significantly more responsibility — and these added duties, along with life as a college student, keeps them busy.

“My busiest days are Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Lunch break was pretty much my only break in between going to classes and ASM last Wednesday,” they explained.

Between school and ASM, Lampron’s life is filled with endless tasks, meetings and challenges, but they shared they still find time to do things they enjoy — like playing guitar and working on their own music. 

Like any democratic government, the student council comprises of executive positions along with representatives from supporting schools and committees.

As a leader of the equity and inclusion committee, it’s Lampron’s responsibility to take proper action when a campus climate issue arises, including meeting with administrators to discuss future action. 

Regarding the controversial racial erasure in the homecoming video, the committee stood in solidarity with all students on campus, Lampron said. 

“We support the Student Inclusion Coalition,” they said. “We just want to move activism in a better place.” 

Lampron’s goal is to foster a welcoming environment for all students.

One way they’re working to encourage this is by coordinating the Badger StepUp campaign — trainings with sororities to teach communities how to be an inclusive space.

While many of the committee's current campaigns address LGBTQ+ issues, they care about changing programs more broadly since the equity and inclusion committee largely serves underrepresented groups on campus.

Lampron’s passion for activism shows through their participation in ASM as it offers a space to make real change on issues students are concerned about.

“Student government is important,” Lampron said. “It is a powerful way for folks to have their voices heard and to change policies that impact our lives.”

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