Skip to Content, Navigation, or Footer.
The Daily Cardinal Est. 1892
Friday, June 21, 2024
As the election to fill a vacant state Supreme Court seat quickly approaches, judges Rebecca Dallet and Michael Screnock juggled their own partisan ties in the officially nonpartisan race.

As the election to fill a vacant state Supreme Court seat quickly approaches, judges Rebecca Dallet and Michael Screnock juggled their own partisan ties in the officially nonpartisan race.

Supreme Court candidates debate partisanship, objectivity in public debate

Vying for a seat on the state Supreme Court, Michael Screnock and Rebecca Dallet took part in a debate on Friday at the Marquette University Law School, both proclaiming an obligation to uphold the law without partisan interests at heart.

Screnock, a Sauk County judge appointed in 2015, claimed that Dallet has a liberal agenda which will make her unable to uphold the law fairly.

Dallet, a Milwaukee County judge since 2008, pointed to Screnock’s ties to special conservative interests, including Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce and the State GOP.

The race for state Supreme Court is officially nonpartisan, but much of Friday’s debate honed in on the candidate’s efforts to remain independent of partisan interests. Screnock is supported by conservatives, while Dallet is favored by liberals.

Screnock argued during the debate that Dallet would not only push a liberal agenda into the Wisconsin Supreme Court, but also brought into question her past cases that she presided over, involving attorneys who have given to her campaign.

“Judge Rebecca Dallet, who has called the rule of law ‘garbage’ and, according to a recent report from the Wisconsin State Journal, has accepted campaign contributions from nearly 40 attorneys who were arguing cases in her court,” Screnock said in a statement.

Dallet faulted Screnock for his endorsement from the National Rifle Association, which claimed the judge promised to support their agenda, while Screnock vehemently denied any ties that would compromise his objectivity.

“I am a Judge, and I have served as an attorney, so I know firsthand the importance of upholding the rule of law, protecting public safety, and respecting the Constitution and the separation of powers,” Screnock said. “I also know about the dangers of legislating from the bench.”

The Dallet campaign declared a victory in the debate, stating that “Judge Dallet proved that she is the best candidate to serve on Wisconsin's Supreme Court. With over 20 years experience in Wisconsin courtrooms, Judge Dallet will restore Wisconsin values of integrity and fairness to our highest court.”

Wisconsin Public Television and Wisconsin Public Radio will host a second debate March 30, followed by the election April 3.

Enjoy what you're reading? Get content from The Daily Cardinal delivered to your inbox
Support your local paper
Donate Today
The Daily Cardinal has been covering the University and Madison community since 1892. Please consider giving today.

Powered by SNworks Solutions by The State News
All Content © 2024 The Daily Cardinal