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Monday, June 14, 2021

Movies

art-velvet buzzsaw from NME.jpg
ARTS

Netflix film 'Velvet Buzzsaw' fine but falls flat

As I comb through the marketing (or lack thereof) in the wake of viewing “Velvet Buzzsaw,” I’m repeatedly confounded by director Dan Gilroy’s quasi-epithetic obsession as the creator of the fantastic 2014 neo-noir “Nightcrawler". While “Nightcrawler” knows exactly what it is in both grounded characterization and sensical narrative progression, “Velvet Buzzsaw” is a gross juxtaposition to such competency. 


If you are unaware of the influence that Queen has had on popular culture, “Bohemian Rhapsody” will quickly educate you on how many Queen songs you’ve definitely heard and know by heart.
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‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ brings rock ‘n’ roll back into the spotlight

As R&B and rap artists dominate our modern music sensibility, rock bands have seemingly ceased to exist in today’s popular culture. One rock band, however, has stood the test of time and cemented their status in music history unlike any other. You’ve definitely heard their songs, but now it’s time to see the passionate musicians behind the scenes and witness a chunk of history where music wasn’t simply something to listen to — it was something to live.


Originally released in 1993, "The Firm" has an impressive cast, impeccable soundtrack and plot from the innovative thriller subgenre. 
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‘The Firm’ is exciting, memorable, engaging

Well, folks, Fall has reached its peak seasonal swing. The leaves have shifted from the lush greens to a deciduous melting pot of auburns, oranges and yellows; humidity recedes into memory as the overwhelming musk of the overcast, rainy woodland sweeps into Madison’s concrete jungle; pumpkins, gourds and an infinity of novelty lattes and doughnuts flood the coffee shops and bakeries of State Street, and so much more.


James Wan's "Aquaman" aims to flesh out DC's seafaring superhero for the silver screen.
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The Daily Cardinal’s most-anticipated films for the fall semester

Following a stereotypical summer of big-budget blockbusters that satisfy the masses and empty our wallets, it’s time to shift our gaze toward a few of the more audacious stories that hope to impress during this upcoming fall semester. These five films have potential to be the perfect escape to the theater for all students struggling to readjust to college life.


From "The Office" to "A Quiet Place," John Krasinski is a recent example of someone who has achieved success in multiple genres [and mediums].
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Genre chameleons: Directors who dive into different flavors of film

Earlier this month, John Krasinski’s “A Quiet Place” was released on home media. Its basic premise — a family living in taciturn paranoia among creatures who hunt via sound — was enough to pique my interest during its initial run in theaters. The film received immense critical and commercial success, reaping its budget tenfold and numerous voices calling it one of the best horror movies in years.


Burnham's directorial debut is a comical take on today's generation of teens. 
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Bo Burnham’s ‘Eighth Grade’ is a sincere addition to the coming-of-age genre

When we discuss the coming-of-age style of storytelling, a dominant preconception of what that entails enters our minds: typically, a vision of young adults — perhaps 18 to 21 years old — as they cross the threshold of adolescence into the larger world beyond the formulaic suburbia. Dwindling friendships, sporadic emotions and an intense pressure from the unknown are common components these stories use to empathize with us viewers, who have experienced some or all of these emotions at one point. In the American education system, the 18-21 range is prime real estate for the subgenre, as the shift from secondary to higher education is inducive to these anxieties.


The psychological terror found in "Hereditary" is more akin to "The Witch" and "The Babadook" than "Friday the 13th."
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'Hereditary' conveys a refreshing sense of what it means to be scared

The topic of familial estrangement is hardly new to the impetus of the narrative arc. In particular recency, plenty of wonderfully made films have explored this idea with a fluid blend of dramatic tension and character development: “Lady Bird,” “I, Tonya,” “Birdman” and perhaps even “Swiss Army Man,” to a degree. The respective character internalizes that emotional severance as a means of either reconciliation or maturation, offering a relatable and believable drive.


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